All insects have antennae, which allow them to respond to free-floating molecules much like noses do in higher organisms. This is a high-magnification view of an antenna from a moth.
Image by Dr. Donna Stolz, University of Pittsburgh.
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All insects have antennae, which allow them to respond to free-floating molecules much like noses do in higher organisms. This is a high-magnification view of an antenna from a moth.

Image by Dr. Donna Stolz, University of Pittsburgh.

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    Hate moths but still cool :3
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